Bought a pentium laptop with display issue

calcmandan

New Member
Sep 23, 2019
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I bought a toshiba satellite 110CS knowing that it had a black screen. I turned it on and I could hear the hdd initializing and the floppy drive buzzing. I suspected the bulb burned out, so I removed the LCD to inspect it.

I can get a new tube or get a used LCD. Torn between which, as the prices for both are similar. why am I torn? i can buy a used and refurbished lcd of the same model. It's still 25+ years old and the tube could go out anytime. If I buy a new tube, then it could just work for years to come. Torn. Need guidance from my peers.

It looks obvious that the flourescent tube is burned out, but who knows maybe tiny little flourescent bulbs of this size look this way. Please confirm.
20191102_111556.jpg


This side looks good upon close inspection.
20191102_111559.jpg
 

calcmandan

New Member
Sep 23, 2019
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Another point. I reconnected everything and did the flashlight test. Not output that I can see. Perhaps it's both the LCD and lamp.

Also, plugging it into an external monitor doesn't show anything either.
 

RetroRob

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Oct 23, 2019
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It could be the display hardware itself that's broken or otherwise inoperative, if connecting it to an external monitor doesn't do anything.
 

calcmandan

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Sep 23, 2019
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oh the video card? well that could very well be the case. i have the device pulled apart because i'm going to restore the outer casing. got the card available on ebay for $15. i'll give that a shot.
 

calcmandan

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Sep 23, 2019
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surplus store guy told me to try a gpu reflow on it. never heard of that before. but whwat's the worst thing that can happen? you're right, it's definitel the vid card if i can't get external vid output.
 

RetroRob

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Oct 23, 2019
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A common method to reflow a board is to put it in the oven. I'll confess that I have no idea what temperature or for how long to do it, but I know that others have done this to surprisingly successful results.
 

calcmandan

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Sep 23, 2019
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I saw a video description for that technique on youtube but haven't watched it yet. I'm just a bit worried that i may overheat the other ocmponents of the video card. It's a riser.

If the reflow method doesn't work, the surplus store offered to repair it for $40. Or I can pay $35 for a replacement board on ebay.

A common method to reflow a board is to put it in the oven. I'll confess that I have no idea what temperature or for how long to do it, but I know that others have done this to surprisingly successful results.
 

calcmandan

New Member
Sep 23, 2019
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Meanwhile, I got busy on the case cleanup. It had tons of scuffs and tough to remove marks. I followed David's technique using baking soda. Did a fine job. And, the result shows some obvious hand wear along the keyboard bezel from where the palm would rest.

So I'm thinking of buffing the plastic to give it a uniform sheen, but being careful to not remove the plastic texture. A basic buffing wheel for plastics and white rouge should do the trick.
 

calcmandan

New Member
Sep 23, 2019
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going to grab a dremel kit at lowes and buff the plastic in the afternoon. ordered a new vga card. having fun with this restoration project. going to use the baking soda/superglue fix for some pieces of plastic. stuff got brittle over 20 years.