Commodore 128

the cavalier

New Member
Jan 8, 2020
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I just purchased a Commodore 128 from my childhood would like to hook it up to a sony 55' smart tv what do i need?......i know i need a s video cable 8 pin and what else? could you post links please
 
Last edited:
May 22, 2019
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Are you going to try to use both the 80 column and 40 column displays?

For starters, you should get an S-Video to HDMI adapter. I use a Kanex Pro 4K video converter. (It also works fine for 720P and 1080P video.)


If you want to use the 80-column display, there's actually another thread here about that. You might pop in over there and take a look. Short version is you need an RGBI to VGA converter, then a VGA scaler to get the image up to something you can feed in to your TV.
 

the cavalier

New Member
Jan 8, 2020
2
0
1
Are you going to try to use both the 80 column and 40 column displays?

For starters, you should get an S-Video to HDMI adapter. I use a Kanex Pro 4K video converter. (It also works fine for 720P and 1080P video.)


If you want to use the 80-column display, there's actually another thread here about that. You might pop in over there and take a look. Short version is you need an RGBI to VGA converter, then a VGA scaler to get the image up to something you can feed in to your TV.
i bought the s video cable and a video converter to hdmi was wondering about the rbi for 80 column
 
May 22, 2019
592
300
63
i bought the s video cable and a video converter to hdmi was wondering about the rbi for 80 column
The problem with the 80 column display is that it uses an RGBI signal, with separate wires for red, green, blue, and brightness. This is a TTL signal, so each line is either ON or OFF. This is completely unlike any modern display standard, so you have to convert that signal first to analog RGB, then from that to HDMI (or at least scale it up to 30Khz for a VGA monitor.)

But there's also a hack: the RGBI port actually displays composite video on pin 7, so you can use that as a hack to make a composite cable. This video explains how to do it... the short version is that you just need pins 1 and 7. Pin 7 goes to the center conductor of an RCA cable, and Pin 1 goes to the ground.

If you want color, you need two or three converters, and this is where things get complicated.

The central part you need is a VGA scaler, which can convert the NTSC-resolution video from the RGBI port up to 30KHz VGA needed to drive a VGA monitor. From there, you can use a VGA to HDMI converter to get HDMI output to your TV or a computer monitor.

The other thing you need is an RGBI to VGA converter. This is a passive component that combines the 4 TTL video signals from the RGBI ports into 3 analog signals needed for the VGA scaler.

For that, I'm going to point you to this thread.

One of these days, I'll build a color converter for my 128. When I do, I'll document that here.