Considerations for Retrobriting

Rain

New Member
Jul 29, 2019
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We should also have a thread where we can post things to consider and warnings when planning to do Retrobriting. So far as what David had experienced Retrobriting encourages rust spreading (if you Retrobrite something that has a metal piece in it ) and it will damage leather parts (as seen in what happened to the handle of the Osborne computer) .
 

B_Billy

New Member
May 31, 2019
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I mentioned this on the Ozone Generator post but as far as using the standard Retobrite method using hydrogen peroxide should be avoided for the original Atari 8-bit plastic (400, 800, etc.). When I had done some testing on the beige-ish/brown-ish/grey-ish plastic, the hydrogen peroxide turned the plastic white. "Lightbriting" is a better method although it does take longer.
 

izverycool

New Member
May 21, 2019
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Something I've learned: the rubber feet on the bottom of my Commodore VIC-20 cases have gone gummy and needed replacing, as David had experienced with several of his retrobrite projects.
 

dcarlson314

New Member
Jun 25, 2019
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Were you talking about the other plastics from the 400/800 models? I'm about to embark on retrobriting two Atari 800 XL's and a VIC-20. I know NOT to do this to the keys as they seem to "marble" or fade, but retrobriting the case seemed to be ok with videos I've seem from others. I'm assuming this is because those plastics were pretty much white already where peroxide briting would be ok, yeah?
 

B_Billy

New Member
May 31, 2019
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@dcarlson314 I would think that would be OK but I've never done it myself on the white plastics of the XL line. I don have a 1050 drive that I'm going to use the "Litebriting" method on. I feel it is safer since it takes longer, it gives you the chance to remove it from the sun light if you notice anything weird happening.

Just to share this, I've tried this "Litebriting" method with other plastics as well; a potato chip bag clip and a plastic cup that both yellowed. I left each of those in the sun for a few days, turning them here and there, and the plastics both went back to white. Personally, I'll be using this method for any "Retrobriting" I do in the future, even if it does take longer.
 
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dcarlson314

New Member
Jun 25, 2019
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Thanks @B_Billy! That's a good idea to test on something less valuable first.

I have another challenge I'd like to deal with. I have an 800XL and a 1050 drive with their cases inscribed with what appears to be inventory numbers. Seems like it was done with a soldering iron and it's inset into the flat part of the case, so sanding it down will simply make an ugly "dented" looking surface.

I'd like to get rid of this but I'm not quite sure how to go about it yet.

Here's an image to show what I mean:
Atari800XL_CaseInscription.jpg


@dcarlson314 I would think that would be OK but I've never done it myself on the white plastics of the XL line. I don have a 1050 drive that I'm going to use the "Litebriting" method on. I feel it is safer since it takes longer, it gives you the chance to remove it from the sun light if you notice anything weird happening.

Just to share this, I've tried this "Litebriting" method with other plastics as well; a potato chip bag clip and a plastic cup that both yellowed. I left each of those in the sun for a few days, turning them here and there, and the plastics both went back to white. Personally, I'll be using this method for any "Retrobriting" I do in the future, even if it does take longer.