I could use some help please! (and thank you :) )

Dpotash87

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Dec 31, 2019
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So, I'm a passionate gamer, and I've had a love of staring at the guts of electronics and lines of obtuse code since I can remember. Now I'm 32 years old, and I have a very keen interest to try and do something, anything with that. I have tons of love for 8 and 16-bit games and really want to start tinkering on my own. I formulated an idea and an approach, I think, to keep myself busy and interested: I want to build a machine based around the 6502 and possibly learn how to work with the assembly code.

Problem: I don't have any training or education, although I'm seeking as much as I can. Which is actually kind of backfiring because I'm getting myself swamped with new information and terms that makes it extremely confusing on how to start. So I'm turning here looking for pointers and advice on how to start.

The really short version: I want to build an 8/16-bit machine to try and work on some of my own software projects (games) and need some serious advice on 1. the hardware and parts to get my hands on and 2. Which coding languages should I be the most concerned with as far as game development with this type of machine?
 
May 22, 2019
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I think building a machine from scratch and then learning to program on it might be a mistake. To put this in perspective... The 8-Bit Guy has several people who do this kind of thing for a living on his team, and it's taken them months to get to the initial prototype stage. That doesn't even take into consideration the amount of software work already done.

To do the same job yourself, you'd have to basically cram in the equivalent of two college degrees - one in computer hardware and one in programming - to reach the same point.

Instead, you should look at existing systems of the era: Commodore 64, Apple II, or MSX. Once you've learned assembly language and something about computer architecture, you can building something or adapting an existing architecture.

I'm not saying "don't follow your dreams." Rather, I'm suggesting that you start by learning how others have done it, learn how to program on one of those machines, and then bring those lessons to your own design.
 
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Dpotash87

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Dec 31, 2019
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Thank you for the reply. I sort of begun to realize that myself with the sheer amount of information I suddenly cracked open. I'm more interested in the programming side honestly, so I'll start hunting for a machine. Thank you again :)
 

zdaddyo

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Sep 24, 2019
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Take a look at this site and watch his videos on YouTube:


This site is full of 6502 goodness:
 
May 22, 2019
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And don't forget emulators... I spend more time with emulated retro systems than I do with the actual, vintage hardware. That's partly because of space, but also partly because emulation just makes it easier to do things like organizing media.