New Project

JHarley

New Member
Jul 29, 2019
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3
Northampton, England
Hi all,

Thought this would be the best place to talk about this as it will run on a Pi in the end, I was watching WarGames earlier today and thought about my yearning for an Imsai 8080 but obviously as we know... I can't afford an 8080, so after watching WarGames I realised that I didn't have a Raspberry Pi case and from my mind came another bizarre idea, my concept was to build a scale(ish) clone of the 8080 running PICO-8 on a Pi, but there was one rule, it had to be made out of stuff I had lying around the house, and for this reason this case will be and is very crude, but I thought it was a nice little project, I will be updating the build on this thread as and when I work on it, here is the "Lightman 8080" so far

Joe
 

Markeno

Member
Jul 19, 2019
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hobbytronics.home.blog
Apologies, only realised that all of my photos are too large to post, however I will still update you on my progress
If you are using a Windows OS, you can open your photos (jpg etc) in "Paint". Then choose "Resize" and scale them down, and re-save as jpg. That is what I do to get them more reasonable for forum or blog postings.

Certainly there are other options and programs. I used to use a image resize tool that I could throw all the files into a folder and start the program it, would then output resized copies of them to another folder. It was nice, but I don't do a lot of photos now, and I generally perfer using Paint to crop the images as well and such as needed. I also used Gimp in the past for similar work, I really like it, but for this task it takes a whole lot longer to open than Paint.

I look forward to seeing the updates.
 

JHarley

New Member
Jul 29, 2019
15
4
3
Northampton, England
If you are using a Windows OS, you can open your photos (jpg etc) in "Paint". Then choose "Resize" and scale them down, and re-save as jpg. That is what I do to get them more reasonable for forum or blog postings.

Certainly there are other options and programs. I used to use a image resize tool that I could throw all the files into a folder and start the program it, would then output resized copies of them to another folder. It was nice, but I don't do a lot of photos now, and I generally perfer using Paint to crop the images as well and such as needed. I also used Gimp in the past for similar work, I really like it, but for this task it takes a whole lot longer to open than Paint.

I look forward to seeing the updates.
Thanks for the advice, I've dropped the 'only use materials lying around the house' rule so I plan to start working on some designs
 
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May 22, 2019
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I'll give you a huge shortcut and suggest you look at the Altair 8800 emulator by David Hansel. The IMSAI 8080 is virtually identical to the Altair 8800, but with an additional set of 8 LEDs to display the state of port 255. Adding the code to display the Programmed Output wouldn't be hard - it's going to take more work to connect to a front panel than it will to do the Programmed Output part.

I've been considering this myself, actually. David's emulator runs well on the Pi (I can get it up to a virtual 88Mhz), but it doesn't interact with a front panel on Windows or Linux. So my thinking was to add a terminal and front panel control program, which would run independently and talk to the emulator software via serial or TCP ports. Then you can make the front panel happen on anything - a computer screen, an Arduino, or even LEDs hooked to the Pi through a bit shifter attached to the GPIO port.

 
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JHarley

New Member
Jul 29, 2019
15
4
3
Northampton, England
I'll give you a huge shortcut and suggest you look at the Altair 8800 emulator by David Hansel. The IMSAI 8080 is virtually identical to the Altair 8800, but with an additional set of 8 LEDs to display the state of port 255. Adding the code to display the Programmed Output wouldn't be hard - it's going to take more work to connect to a front panel than it will to do the Programmed Output part.

I've been considering this myself, actually. David's emulator runs well on the Pi (I can get it up to a virtual 88Mhz), but it doesn't interact with a front panel on Windows or Linux. So my thinking was to add a terminal and front panel control program, which would run independently and talk to the emulator software via serial or TCP ports. Then you can make the front panel happen on anything - a computer screen, an Arduino, or even LEDs hooked to the Pi through a bit shifter attached to the GPIO port.

Thanks Tom, can't thank you enough, I was actually going to start with something simpler but this seems quite good, I've been away recently so I haven't even got around to doing the case designs but when I get some free time I will
 
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JHarley

New Member
Jul 29, 2019
15
4
3
Northampton, England
UPDATE (Sort Of...): Ok, so I realize I've gone a bit quiet on this project and me and my father had some quite good ideas, one of which would actually drop the Pi from this project (which I don't really want to do), Idea 1: This would stick with the Pi but would step away from using the Altair/Imsai source code, the Imsai case would be used for my RetroPie machine and would (obviously) would emulate a series of different systems. Idea 2: Would use the Imsai case and emulate the Altair/Imsai source code, However this would essentially be a Sleeper PC running Windows 10, to use for other games and game streaming services, these two ideas become a bit of a fork in the road in budget, size and design and Idea 2 would step away from this project's original purpose.

Anyway that's all from me for the moment,

Thanks,

Joe
 

JHarley

New Member
Jul 29, 2019
15
4
3
Northampton, England
UPDATE: Ok, so once again I've gone quiet for nearly a month on this, I got a bit distracted and essentially this project has evolved into me building my fantasy computer system, so I guess what I'm trying to say is I'm pretty much dropping the whole IMSAI Concept, but I'd like to thank everyone for their help on this and it will eventually become the launchpad for me building my dream computer (which will also be Pi based).

Many thanks,

Joe
 
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